Kick off the New Year with a new short story by yours truly!

Cover of "Not Malicious. Just Unlucky"

Not Malicious. Just Unlucky

A fantasy short story

That’s right. I have FINALLY succeeded in indie publishing all four of the short stories originally published in Fantastic Depths. You can now find all four of them on ebook retailers everywhere.

Here’s the sales blurb for Not Malicious. Just Unlucky for those who don’t know what it’s about:

“For four years, Alica Onok has been trying to get rid of a mysterious enchanted staff that has caused her nothing but trouble since her grandmother gave it to her on her twentieth birthday. Yet it seems like no matter what Alica does, the staff always returns to her, whole and in one piece, as if it had never left her side at all.

Then Alica finds out that an unlucky spirit lives within the staff, a spirit who has been bounded to the staff for years and wants his freedom now. Without knowing any magic herself, however, Alica is powerless to free the spirit, forcing her to come up with an alternative means of doing so. Because if she fails, she will remain cursed with unluckiness forever.

Also contains an excerpt from Timothy L. Cerepaka’s next novel, “The Last Legend: Glitch Apocalypse,” set for release in January 2015 from Annulus Publishing.”

Buy Not Malicious. Just Unlucky from:

Amazon I Barnes & Noble I Kobo I Smashwords I Google Play I DriveThruFiction I Libiro I XinXii I Omnilit

In my opinion, the biggest selling point is that it has an excerpt from my upcoming science-fantasy novel, The Last Legend: Glitch Apocalypse, which is set for release later this month. So if you want to get a sneak peek of my next novel, I suggest downloading Not Malicious. Just Unlucky from your favorite ebook retailer and reading it right away.

Regarding my new website: It’s still not ready to go live. However, I think it will be ready to go live after January 5th, which is three days away. I will post more about my new website once I have a firm launch date in mind.

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Are you writing a story or building a world?

Several years back, I tried my hand at writing what I planned to be a five book epic science-fantasy series (that I might still write some day, so I won’t share too many details here to avoid spoilers).

Because this was my first serious attempt at writing an original story (up until then I had written mostly fanfiction), I was determined not to go in blind. So I took a long time to worldbuild, crafting world after world, character after character, culture after culture, all with the intent of making the best imaginary universe I could for my series. It would be even better than the Star Wars universe or the Star Trek universe or any of the other countless detailed fictional universes out there. Okay, maybe not better than any of those, but it would certainly be great.

When I decided I had done enough worldbuilding, I sat down to write the first book in the series. And I did; I wrote a few drafts, changing details that didn’t make sense to me, doing what any writer does when working on a novel, the usual stuff, you know.

And then, after the third or fourth draft, I just lost interest in the series.

I still have the drafts, still have all the worldbuilding notes. I haven’t tossed any of it away and frankly I don’t want to because I might still return to it someday.

I just don’t want to write it. Even though I couldn’t wait to write it before, it has been years since I last wrote about any of the characters or worlds I made (although I have borrowed a few ideas and names because I liked them a lot). Why did this happen?

I believe this happened because I lost sight of the series’ heart. I got so caught up in worldbuilding that I forgot this very essential, basic fact: That I was writing a story, not building a world.

To be sure, worldbuilding is highly important in speculative fiction. I don’t disagree with that. It’s just that I forgot that I was creating a world for the story, not the world for its own sake. As fun as worldbuilding is, to the speculative fiction writer, one must always ask the question, “Does this help the story?”

Some people worldbuild for the sake of worldbuilding. And if that helps, sure, go ahead. Have fun. I have a lot of fun doing it, too, at least when I’m on a roll.

But not all of us find worldbuilding for the sake of worldbuilding so wonderful. Remember what we’re doing here; we’re writing speculative fiction. Not world guides. Not gaming manuals. Not Wikis. Not histories. Fiction. Stories. Adventures. Art. Life, even, if you want to go that far.

Worldbuilding is a tool and should be treated as such. In my inexperience, I lost sight of the story for the sake of making more and more detailed worldbuilding notes on subjects that weren’t even important to my story. I unconsciously treated worldbuilding as an end in itself. And it killed my series as a result. Or at least put it into a coma that it has yet to awaken from.

My advice to all speculative fiction writers out there, to beginners and veterans alike, is this: When you find yourself getting lost in worldbuilding, ask yourself, “Am I writing a story or building a world for its own sake?”

The answer will determine what you should do next.

What about you, my readers? What have your experiences been with worldbuilding? Do you like worldbuilding? How much worldbuilding is enough and how much is too little? Post your thoughts in the comments!

-Tim